[681]: Twisted Palace by Erin Watt

29519517 Twisted Palace by Erin Watt
Series: The Royals, #3
Everafter Romance | October 17th, 2016
Source: Bought, Kindle Edition
New Adult Fiction | Romance
Rating: 2 out of 5 Stars


These Royals will ruin you…

From mortal enemies to unexpected allies, two teenagers try to protect everything that matters most.

Ella Harper has met every challenge that life has thrown her way. She’s tough, resilient, and willing to do whatever it takes to defend the people she loves, but the challenge of a long-lost father and a boyfriend whose life is on the line might be too much for even Ella to overcome.

Reed Royal has a quick temper and even faster fists. But his tendency to meet every obstacle with violence has finally caught up with him. If he wants to save himself and the girl he loves, he’ll need to rise above his tortured past and tarnished reputation.

No one believes Ella can survive the Royals. Everyone is sure Reed will destroy them all.
They may be right.

With everything and everyone conspiring to keep them apart, Ella and Reed must find a way to beat the law, save their families, and unravel all the secrets in their Twisted Palace.


SPOILERS AHEAD: 

I can’t even with this book. Someone should’ve warned me that it will make me so mad and that I’m better off skipping. The general feeling I went through was extreme anger at had constantly pondered how evil everyone is!  And what the hell was that, Ella? Where the fuck was the spunk you were famous for from the first two books? It’s like you’ve decided to let everybody walk all over you. Gah.

In case it’s not obvious from my ranty opening paragraph, I did not enjoy this book one bit. [Insert GIF of Bradley Cooper from Silver Linings Playbook throwing a book out the window here.] Sigh. 

The end of the second book had Reed getting picked up by cops for allegedly killing Brooke. As if that wasn’t enough to have us salivating for Twisted Palace, Ella’s supposedly dead father showed up out of the blue. And then there’s the whole, Ella-is-still-a-virgin-because-Reed-wouldn’t-put-out thing — all these added to the general anxiety and excitement for this series finale. So of course,  I had to make time for this book. But as far as series endings go, this was horrible. I’m not talking about the writing at all. I’m talking about how miserable it was. Unfortunate, considering, many have anticipated for this release and to have us go through what we went through was just awful.

In the spirit of honesty, I skipped a shit load of things I couldn’t bring myself to read: Steve’s assholery, Dinah’s bitchery, and Ella’s bid for martyrdom. There is nothing worse than having an overwhelming feeling of anger while reading a book. And since I was reading it on my iPad, the swiping got too real, y’all. It was not fun and it defeats the purpose of finding the joy in reading.

As far as mysteries go, the authors didn’t provide any red herrings to chase. Which was frustrating enough because I felt like everyone trying to solve the case was chasing their tails. I’m glad, however, that Ella and Reed weren’t the ones who solved the mystery of the killer’s identity. Because I hate convenience in mystery.

With that being said, I stand by my earlier sentiment that this was a miserable installment. The ending was clean, abrupt, and unfortunately, unsatisfactory.

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[680]: Alex + Ada by J Luna & Sarah Vaughn

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Alex + Ada by Jonathan Luna and Sarah Vaughn

“People worry that computers will get too smart and take over the world, but the real problem is that they’re too stupid and they’ve already taken over the world.”
― Pedro Domingos

This is like that movie with Will Smith about robots becoming sentient and unleashing holy hell to all humans. Alex is a lonely human who hasn’t quite gotten over his failed relationship after 7 months. On his birthday, he received a gift in the form of a Tanaka X5 from his wealthy grandmother. He didn’t warm up to the idea right away. He thought it was unethical to have a human-like robot catering to his every whim. But he couldn’t bring himself to return her.

Once he kept her, however, he wasn’t satisfied. He needed her to be able to make her own decisions, have her own opinions.  “Waking up” an android is against the law but that didn’t stop him from seeking out a way to make her even more human-like.

The graphics in this novel has a very minimalistic approach. I mean, compared to the others that I’ve read in the past, the drawings wasn’t bogged down with unnecessary “background noise”.  It made for an easy time trying to follow the storyline because it does not distract you from the dialogues. I did, however, encounter problems with the dialogues. Though, that’s my general problem with graphic novels. Especially if there are a lot of back and forth between characters. I had a hard time following along with the conversation.

I wish I bought the second book to this series right away. Because now, I’m dying to read the next. This volume is a compilation of five issues and it ended with Ada “woken up”. Looking forward to her adventures with Alex!

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[679]: Our Chemical Hearts by Krystal Sutherland

28186273 Our Chemical Hearts by Krystal Sutherland
G.P. Putnam’s Sons | October 4th, 2016
Source: Publisher | ARC Paperback
Young Adult Fiction | Contemporary
Rating 3 out of 5 Stars


Henry Page has never been in love. He fancies himself a hopeless romantic, but the slo-mo, heart palpitating, can’t-eat-can’t-sleep kind of love that he’s been hoping for just hasn’t been in the cards for him—at least not yet. Instead, he’s been happy to focus on his grades, on getting into a semi-decent college and finally becoming editor of his school newspaper. Then Grace Town walks into his first period class on the third Tuesday of senior year and he knows everything’s about to change.

Grace isn’t who Henry pictured as his dream girl—she walks with a cane, wears oversized boys’ clothes, and rarely seems to shower. But when Grace and Henry are both chosen to edit the school paper, he quickly finds himself falling for her. It’s obvious there’s something broken about Grace, but it seems to make her even more beautiful to Henry, and he wants nothing more than to help her put the pieces back together again. And yet, this isn’t your average story of boy meets girl. Krystal Sutherland’s brilliant debut is equal parts wit and heartbreak, a potent reminder of the bittersweet bliss that is first love.


It could’ve been so good; there were flashes of brilliance, sure. But they were quickly dulled by half-formed characters who deceptively sounded larger than life. Moreover, these characters easily fit in the pages of a John Green novel: quick-witted, obnoxiously smart however physically flawed. But the story took forever to come to life, and I wouldn’t have minded it if the book offered more.

Grace Town is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.

Truthfully, readers don’t really get to know Grace Town. Her past defined her as a character and we don’t see anything else but her visceral, all-encompassing grief. She didn’t apologize for not being able to give more of herself or her heart to Henry, and because Henry was so smitten, he didn’t ask for what he deserved. If you haven’t read this book, be warned that this is a disastrous kind of love story. Though, that’s hardly a spoiler since it said so on the back of the book.

On the other hand, Henry narrating the book might be the reason why we don’t get to know Grace. Grief and debilitating guilt are all we know about her. But it’s really tough to connect to a grieving character when we don’t their history. And that is what I struggled the most about Our Chemical Hearts. I think I spent most of the time waiting for the story to develop. The majority of the book focused on Henry and his inexplicable attraction to Grace. He was drawn by her enigma and the more she kept him at arm’s length, the harder it was for him to resist. Overall, this was not an insightful book about grief. I think it would be more effective if this was told in Grace’s perspective.

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