On the Night Table [59]

Happy Monday, everyone! And if you’re in Canada, I hope you’re having a solemn Remembrance Day. Selfishly, I took the opportunity to catch up on sleep, rearrange my bedroom bookshelves, and shelve some read books to gain some order in my life.

I started reading Girl, Wash Your Face by Rachel Hollis last Saturday, and even if there’s nothing mind-blowing about her advice, it helped me gain some perspective about how I’m feeling lately. The root cause of my maudlin mood that has nothing to do with the weather, but with how I’ve been overwhelming myself with shit that don’t matter.

The first thing I did was deactivate my personal Facebook account. I’ll tell you how I feel when the week is through. The next thing I did was well, clean my bedroom even though my bedroom is pretty spartan to begin with, I still thought it could use a bit more organizing. My bedroom is my haven and where I do the most of my reading, so it has to be clean and organized all the time. I also cleaned my bookshelves in my bedroom to make room for the books that were sitting on the floor. I definitely need to do an unhauling one of these days, but I just don’t know where to start. Sigh.

Anyway, like I mentioned on my recent Hoarders post, I finally reached my all-time goal of 2,000 books. As well, my Goodreads goal for the year of 230 books. So this week, I decided to read the books I received for review — which isn’t much considering I’ve hold off requesting for most of the year:

Quichotte by Salman Rushdie | What Makes Us by Rafi Mittlefehldt | Well Met by Jen DeLuca

All these books are from Penguin Random House Canada. I also got The Toll by Neal Shusterman from Simon & Schuster in the mail last week but I haven’t read Thunderhead so I can’t read this yet. I’m re-reading Scythe so I can read Thunderhead.

I’m also endeavouring to read The Institute by Stephen King — only the second Stephen King novel in my arsenal. As well, Madame Bovary which is a classic lit about an unsatisfied married woman looking for romance in her otherwise lackluster marriage. I’ve always wanted to read it, so I thought since I now have the time, I might as well.

Please come back and check out my review of Dirty Letters by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward on Thursday, the 14th. It’s my tour stop and y’all know I haven’t done too many of those as well. This is all for now, everyone. Thank you for being my sounding board. <3

Have a great week!

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On the Night Table [58]

The Night Mark by Tiffany Reisz | The Blacksmith Queen by GA Aiken | Open Your Eyes by Paula Daly

Hello!

Man, it feels like forever since I’ve given you guys a reading update. Last week, I meant to at least have a couple of things to post but I didn’t intend to post them in one day! *facepalm* Anyway, things have not quite settle down at work so I’ve been a little behind. Today (Sunday), I decided to just sit down and do a few scheduling.

I started The Night Mark by Tiffany Reisz yesterday and have been enjoying it, so I want to finish it this week. I also aim to start The Blacksmith Queen because even if I’m not a fan of fantasy, I have heard some good things, least of all is how funny this book is. I started listening to Open Your Eyes by Paula Day. I’ve got to be honest and say that I don’t know anything about this book. It feels like a suspense/mystery, but I could be wrong. I’ve only read one book by this author in the past and have enjoyed it. So hopefully, I’ll feel the same way about this one.

R E A D L A S T W E E K

I didn’t think it was possible, but I actually read 9 books last week. A couple were re-reads, and a couple are instant favourite reads — for this year, at least.

  • Saving Francesca by Melina Marchetta is a re-read. I always have a compunction to read Ms. Marchetta’s books no matter the season. In the summer, I managed to re-read her Lumatere Chronicles at least three times. This one is just as wonderful as I remember.
  • Finnikin of the Rock by Melina Marchetta is the first book to her Lumatere Chronicles – a fantasy that I could read and re-read for a number of times and I will never not cry, nor laugh, nor give it any less than 5 stars. It is so freaking good.
  • Lie With Me by Philippe Benson was a book translated from French by Molly Ringwald. Yes, of the Sixteen Candles and Breakfast Club fame. Unfortunately, this book did not meet my expectations. It was very dry and very minimalist in terms of the story telling.
  • Hold My Hand by Michael Barakiva. This book made me so mad. The second book to the One Man Guy duology, Hold My Hand continues the story of Alek and Ethan. I have no idea why Barakiva decided to ruin Alek and Ethan to their fans, but that’s exactly what he did. As much as I like to check back on previous characters, the way the author went about it completely ruined the experience for me. I wish I never read it.
  • Savage Appetites by Rachel Monroe. This book was fantastic. It’s a non-fiction true crime novel about women’s fascination with gruesome, well, crime novels. This was completely fascinating and while I’m not a part of that statistics, it was interesting to see why. She theorizes that it’s a way for us to arm ourselves with knowledge if we do find ourselves in any unfortunate situations where we may become victims.
  • The Grace Year by Kim Liggett was one of my favourite reads this year. At times unsettling, this is the story of a society where girls — at a ripe age of 16 are released into the wild (outskirts) in an attempt to discover their magic powers. The story is a pulse-pounding read most of the time but there were tender moments as well aim to help the readers cope with the disturbing scenarios unfolding before their eyes.
  • The Mothers by Brit Bennett. This book has been on my wishlist forever. When I saw it on Book Outlet, I couldn’t miss the chance. This is about a romance between a white pastor’s son and a black teen girl who ended up with a pregnancy out of wedlock. The story spans for years that shows the effect of their decision to have an abortion. I loved this one as well. It shows religion in all its hypocritical glory, the lives of people in small towns, and how a girl’s reputation follows her for years no matter her status in life.
  • Birthday by Meredith Russo. Yet another instant favourite. This is the story of two boys were friends since they were small children. They were born on the same day, and over the years, they were each other’s haven and shoulders they can depend on. At times heartbreaking, Morgan and Eric remained true friends even when Morgan decides to embrace the truth that she was born in the wrong body. I loved this one.
  • Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli. Sigh. I unfortunately didn’t quite enjoy Ms. Albertalli’s follow up to Simon vs. The Universe. I found Leah condescending most of the time and her inner lamentations just drove me batty. I did love seeing Simon and Brahms again, though.

I hope you’re all having a great reading month so far. October is coming to a close and before we know it, it’s 2020. God. One more year of the orange terror. Let this nightmare end soon. Lol.

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On the Night Table [57]

Happy Monday, y’all.

I spent the entire weekend catching up on everything I’ve missed on Bloglovin’. Last week was hectic and exhausting so I didn’t have much time to do anything of the sort. Our fiscal year end was at the end of September so I had a few things I needed to do. I’m so glad it’s done. I technically have until the 18th but I didn’t want to prolong the agony, so to speak. Lol.

This week, I’ve got a couple of thrillers and a Rick Riordan classic. I know, I know. Kind of extremes, but I love shocking myself. And of course, I have my stock of audio books that I borrowed from the library:

CURRENTLY LISTENING

The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai | America’s Reluctant Prince by Steven M. Gillon | Normal People by Sally Rooney | Color Me In by Nasha Diaz

I listened to the three of the seven books I borrowed last week which leaves me with these four. The only one that will take me a few days to listen to is the 18-hour-long, America’s Reluctant Prince.

BOOKS READ LAST WEEK

I read and listened to a total of 7 books last week. For the first time in a long time, I actually read the books on my recent On The Night Table post.

Inside Out by Demi Moore | Permanent Record by Edward Snowden | Frankly in Love by David Yoon | The Darkest Star by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Inside Out by Demi Moore – 5/5 Stars | Permanent Record by Edward Snowden – 3/5 Stars | Frankly In Love by David Yoon – 4/5 Stars | The Darkest Star – 4/5 Stars.

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor | The Order of Nature by Josh Scheineirt | With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor – 5/5 Stars | The Order of Nature by Josh Scheinert – 5/5 Stars | With The Fire On High – 4/5 Stars

That’s how my week went, y’all. I hope you’ll have a great one! Happy reading!

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On the Night Table [56]

Let’s just say I wasn’t very successful in reading what I’d planned last week. I only managed to start The Order of Nature by Josh Scheinert. I tried reading the other two books but they didn’t stick. This week, I’m trying to finish a couple of books that I’ve started this past weekend, and a starter series from Jennifer L. Armentrout.

I’m halfway through The Order of Nature and Frankly In Love. I’m loving both even if we didn’t get off to a good start. The Darkest Star is the first book to JLA’s spin off of The Luxe series. While I didn’t finish that series, I wanted to see if I’m going to have a better luck with this one. Wish me luck.

So these are the books I’m endeavouring to read this week. Have you read them?

Happy Reading!

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On the Night Table [55]

So I stumbled a little bit last week with my postings. What happened was, I weighed myself last Monday and the results showed that things are digressing. Subsequently, I went hard at the gym, increased my cardio a little bit by walking at lunch for an hour or after the gym at night. Yeah, I know. I went a little nuts. But if you don’t know it yet, I worked hard to lose 50 lbs in the last two years so it would be a shame if allow myself to fall back into bad habits. Rest assured, I’m making sure to manage my time better so I don’t neglect blogging again.

This week’s reading queue includes a book that I wanted to read for Fall, a book by an indie author, and a book that was sent to me for review that I thought I’d read already but apparently, I haven’t.

The Order of Nature is written by a Canadian author who drew from his experiences travelling in parts of Africa. In some countries of the continent, homosexuality is a taboo thing that could lead in imprisonment or worst. This is a book about a gay couple who was prosecuted for their sexuality and their experiences as they fight for their freedom, and ultimately, for their lives. I saw this book on YouTube as a book recommendation for fans of Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda, but I fail to see how something as heavy as this could be compared to Simon, to be honest. Simon’s problems seems so small somehow, that is, in comparison to imprisonment or death. Regardless, curiosity won out so I ordered a copy.

Girl, Wash Your Face is a book that I talked about in my Fall TBR. I want to get this out of the way. It’s a slight book, and like I said, the general consensus is that it was nothing groundbreaking but I want to read it anyway.

Rayne & Delilah’s Midnite Matinee was a book that was sent to me last year for review. I was sure I read and reviewed it, but I guess I haven’t considering I can’t find where I wrote my review. Perhaps it will come back to me once I start reading it.

R E A D L A S T W E E K

The Last Romantics by Tara Conklin | Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin | Serpent & Dove by Shelby Mahurin

The Last Romantics by Tara Conklin was a great family saga. Just a little weirded out that the story present point in time was decades well into the future. Like, 2079? So weird. Lol. 4/5 Stars.

I already talked about Giovanni’s Room last Saturday and how disappointing it was. I didn’t like the main character at all. He used people and deserted those who’ve helped him. He was spoiled and very entitled. 2 out of 5 Stars.

Serpent & Dove was great. It’s been a while since a read about witches and magic so it’s a great re-introduction. 4 out of 5 Stars.

Bear Town by Fredrik Backman | Call Them By Their True Names by Rebecca Solnit | Forbidden by Beverly Jenkins

Bear Town was so good. It’s a commentary on why women are terrified to come forward when they’re sexually assaulted, essentially rape culture and how men and women alike contribute to the narrative. It was a community who found themselves divided into two: those who believed the girl who was raped, and those who don’t. 5 out of 5 Stars!

Call Them By Their True Names discusses all the things that are wrong with America. Racism, classism, violence against coloured people, the corruption in the current government…and a partridge in a pear tree. You almost have to start over and erase the entire history in order to fix what’s wrong with America. Because, damn. It’s deeply rooted and has gone on since the birth of the country.

Forbidden by Beverly Jenkins was fantastic. Really enjoyed the first book to this series. On to the next series from Ms. Jenkins!

DNF! My first DNF of the year belongs to Ms. Nora Roberts’ Undercurrents. This is a new release. Unfortunately, I didn’t get very far with this as it deals with abuse. It’s not for those with weak stomachs.

Let me know if you’ve already read any of the books I’m going to be reading this week. If so, did you like it?

I hope you’ll have a great week, y’all.

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On the Night Table [54]

Serpent & Dove by Shelby Mahurin | Beartown by Fredrik Backman | Emergency Sex and Other Desperate Measures by Cain, Thompson & Postlewait|

Happy Monday, all!

I had another outstanding reading week last week. Thanks to the very Fall-like weather, I was not motivated to go to the gym, so I ended up reading under the bed covers. Chalking that up to self-care. Lol. I read a total of eleven books. ELEVEN. Books. Yes. But to be fair, I read two shorties and one graphic novel: Finding Langston & I’m Afraid of Men, and Fence, Volume 3. So technically, I only read 9 books which, I guess would match my total from a week a go. Still an astronomical number, though.

So today, I thought I’d share what I want to get to this week. I started Serpent & Dove on Friday night. I’m conflicted. While this book started out great, I’m getting a little bored with it as I go along. I wish the plot would move a bit faster. Beartown by Fredrik Bachman is one I started a while ago but I had to put it down for whatever reasons. Emergency Sex and Other Desperate Measures is a non fiction about three doctors wholly involved in Doctors Without Borders. Basically, they tell theirs stories and experiences about being in the frontline of conflict. Can’t wait to finish all three this week.

Here are the books I read last week:

Fence, Volume 3 by CS Pacat | Every Exquisite Thing by Matthew Quick | The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandi | The Last Voyage of Poe Blythe

The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary | Finding Langston by Lesa Cline-Ransome | My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Montfegh | Vox by Christina Dalcher

I’m Afraid of Men by Vivek Shraya | Breathless by Beverly Jenkins | Odd One Out by Nic Stone

If I have to pick a favourite, I say it’s a toss up between The Flatshare and My Year of Rest and Relaxation. Let me know if you’re interested in any of the books I read last week.

xoxo

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On the Night Table [53]

Hey, all. How was your weekend? I didn’t get much reading done as weekends are usually crazy busy in my house. My husband works at night during the week so he typically naps all weekend long which means I have to do most of the household chores if I ever want to keep a clean house and have some clean laundry for the entire family. Lol.

Anyway, the last time I did one of these was November of last year – certainly been a while. This week, I have a 2016 release from David Arnold and a recent one from Sandra Brown. While Ms. Brown is a staple on my shelves, David Arnold’s work are a new taste. Can I just say that this was such a pain to write? WordPress is such a bitch to use nowadays. *facepalm* And I think I missed one WordPress update so now, I can’t download the newest one because I’m missing a component. Seriously considering switching to another platform if it weren’t such a pain and a half. Sigh.

So here are the synopsis:

FBI agent Drex Easton is relentlessly driven by a single goal: to outmaneuver the conman once known as Weston Graham. Over the past thirty years, Weston has assumed many names and countless disguises, enabling him to lure eight wealthy women out of their fortunes before they disappeared without a trace, their families left without answers and the authorities without clues. The only common trait among the victims: a new man in their life who also vanished, leaving behind no evidence of his existence . . . except for one signature custom.

Drex is convinced that these women have been murdered, and that the man he knows as Weston Graham is the sociopath responsible. But each time Drex gets close to catching him, Weston trades one persona for another and disappears again. Now, for the first time in their long game of cat and mouse, Drex has a suspect in sight.

Attractive and charming, Jasper Ford is recently married to a successful businesswoman many years his junior, Talia Shafer. Drex insinuates himself into their lives, posing as a new neighbor and setting up surveillance on their house. The closer he gets to the couple, the more convinced he becomes that Jasper is the clever, merciless predator he’s sought–and that his own attraction to Talia threatens to compromise his purpose and integrity.

This is Drex’s one chance to outfox his cunning nemesis before he murders again and eludes justice forever. But first he must determine if the desirable Talia is a heartless accomplice . . . or the next victim.

Victor Benucci and Madeline Falco have a story to tell.
It begins with the death of Vic’s father.
It ends with the murder of Mad’s uncle.
The Hackensack Police Department would very much like to hear it.
But in order to tell their story, Vic and Mad must focus on all the chapters in between.

This is a story about:

1. A coded mission to scatter ashes across New Jersey.
2. The momentous nature of the Palisades in winter.
3. One dormant submarine.
4. Two songs about flowers.
5. Being cool in the traditional sense.
6. Sunsets & ice cream & orchards & graveyards.
7. Simultaneous extreme opposites.
8. A narrow escape from a war-torn country.
9. A story collector.
10. How to listen to someone who does not talk.
11. Falling in love with a painting.
12. Falling in love with a song.
13. Falling in love.

I really am sorry for the formatting of this post. I have to figure it all out somehow. I hope you’ll have a great week of reading and nice weather, y’all.

xoxo

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On the Night Table [52]


Hello!

On this week’s episode of On the Night Table, I thought I try to relieve some stress off my bedroom floor by picking books from my bedroom shelf.

I’ve pretty much neglected this shelf for a long time now, so I thought it was high time I pulled some books down to read from these stacks. As you can tell, these shelves are somewhat colour coordinated. So I just sort of picked one book from each colour. Lol.

Choices are a little random but that’s what usually happens when there’s no rhyme or reason to my shelving organization.

Have you read any of these?

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On the Night Table [51]


Fling Club by Tara Brown | What If It’s Us by Albertalli & Silvera | Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

It certainly has been a while since I’ve posted one of these.

This week, I’m aiming to read two books that I’ve received for review and one that I’ve salivated for this past summer.

Fling Club by Tara Brown promises to be a funny read about revenge in the land of the rich and famous. I’m down for witnessing the castration of a cheater, so yeah. I decided to finally pick this up. Lol.

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera. Are there better character names than Arthur and Ben? I tell you, if I ever have boys babies in the future, I certainly will choose these names. Boys who love boys stories are my jam, so yeah. DYING to finally read this!

Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram. I’m a quarter in. Looking forward to reading the rest. Darius is a quirky but lonely boy that makes my maternal instincts go haywire. I just want to hug him. <3

What are you reading this week?

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On The Night Table [50]


Good Morning, everyone.

This week’s On the Night Table are a couple of books that I knew next to nothing about. So here is the Goodreads synopsis for both books:

Addie is visiting Ireland for her aunt’s over-the-top destination wedding, and hoping she can stop thinking about the one horrible thing she did that left her miserable and heartbroken—and threatens her future. But her brother, Ian, isn’t about to let her forget, and his constant needling leads to arguments and even a fistfight between the two once inseparable siblings. Miserable, Addie can’t wait to visit her friend in Italy and leave her brother—and her problems—behind.

So when Addie discovers an unusual guidebook, Ireland for the Heartbroken, hidden in the dusty shelves of the hotel library, she’s able to finally escape her anxious mind and Ian’s criticism.

And then their travel plans change. Suddenly Addie finds herself on a whirlwind tour of the Emerald Isle, trapped in the world’s smallest vehicle with Ian and his admittedly cute, Irish-accented friend Rowan. As the trio journeys over breathtaking green hills, past countless castles, and through a number of fairy-tale forests, Addie hopes her guidebook will heal not only her broken heart, but also her shattered relationship with her brother.

That is if they don’t get completely lost along the way.

Who doesn’t want to visit the mystical, Ireland?


In the tradition of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, a captivating mystery about a boy with synesthesia—a condition that causes him to see colors when he hears sounds—who tries to uncover what happened to his beautiful neighbor, and if he was ultimately responsible.

Thirteen-year-old Jasper Wishart lives in a world of dazzling color that no one else can see, least of all his dad. Words, numbers, days of the week, people’s voices—everything has its own unique shade. But recently Jasper has been haunted by a color he doesn’t like or understand: the color of murder.

Convinced he’s done something terrible to his new neighbor, Bee Larkham, Jasper revisits the events of the last few months to paint the story of their relationship from the very beginning. As he struggles to untangle the knot of untrustworthy memories and colors that will lead him to the truth, it seems that there’s someone else out there determined to stop him—at any cost.

Both a refreshing coming-of-age story and an intriguing mystery, The Color of Bee Larkham’s Murder is a poignant and unforgettable read—perfect for fans of bestselling authors such as Fredrik Backman and Graeme Simsion.

Imagine having your senses so tuned to the colours of sound?

So have you read these? Let me know in the comments!

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