Listening Library [5]

I downloaded some pretty fantastic audiobooks from the library the last couple of weeks — half nonfiction and general fiction. Including a couple that has become an instant favourite of mine: Invisible Women and The Day the World Came to Town. I hope to write a review for them once I process everything and maybe even reread them.

  • Invisible Women by Caroline Criado-Perez. 5/5 Stars. This is such a fantastic read about all the ways the system is working against women. Fascinating, eye-opening, thought-provoking. Honestly one of those reads that will make you go hmmm with every turn of the page.
  • Three Women by Lisa Taddeo. 3/5 Stars. I wish I could like this more. This book is a nonfiction that reads like fiction tackling three women’s relationship with sex and how much control they lost once they let sex dictates their relationships with men. I didn’t love it for the simple fact that there were no resolutions at the end of it.
  • The Day the World Came to Town by Jim Defede. 5/5 Stars. Oh, this book. I cried for practically the whole time I was reading this. It’s about the generosity and kindness of the people of Gander, Newfoundland during the tragedy of 9/11. I absolutely loved it.
  • The Rainbow Comes and Goes by Anderson Cooper and Gloria Vanderbilt. 4/5 Stars. I saw Anderson Cooper in the Summer when he talked about his life, his career and his relationship with his mom. This is, I guess a more nuanced version of those stories particularly how his relationship with his mom shaped the kind of person he is now.
  • The Summer Before the War is unread. I have a physical copy from a while back but I haven’t read it so when I saw it was available to borrow, I downloaded it right away.
  • Her Royal Highness by Rachel Hawkins. 3/5 Stars. This is pretty cute, I supposed. It’s a romance between an Scottish princess and a jilted American girl who got cheated on back in the States. So she applied for a scholarship to a boarding school in Scotland where she meets the princess — who at first hated her guts. It was enjoyable and made me want to read the first book, The Royals.
  • Washington Black by Esi Edugyan is also unread. I picked up a hardcopy at a thriftstore, so I’m excited to finally get this off my TBR.
  • Open Your Eyes by Paula Daly. 4/5 Stars. This was a good mystery about the competitiveness of the publishing industry. It has blackmail, intrigue, attempted murder…etc. Very compelling.

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Listening Library [4]

Hello!

It’s been a minute. 🙂 This week’s audiobook haul includes three non-fiction that I’m super pumped to get from my library. I’m also excited to listen to Ms. Acevedo’s recent release, and while The Right Swipe received some polarizing reviews, I decided to see what the big hoopla was about. So here are the books I downloaded this week:

With The Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo | Color Me In by Natasha Diaz | The Right Swipe by Alisha Rai | Normal People by Sally Rooney
Permanent Record by Edward Snowden | America’s Reluctant Prince by Steven M. Gillon | Inside Out by Demi Moore

I listened to Permanent Record by Edward Snowden. This book is not so much about what happened in 2012 when he exposed how NSA was surveilling the American people without their consent and how the information was collected. Rather, this is about how he arrived to the decision to forgo his freedom for the sake of exposing his government’s intrusion. It was interesting and it made me think about how I feel about my privacy being invaded for the safety of the country. I’m still thinking about it.

I just finished Demi Moore’s memoir. I loved this one. She was brutally honest about her childhood, her dysfunctional parents, her rape, her addictions, her marriages, and how she’s trying to break free from her past by confronting the ugly truths about it all. I will probably pick up a physical copy at some point.

I’m really excited about all these books, especially the JFK jr one.

Let me know what you’re listening to this week!

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Listening Library [3]

This week is a little light. I chose to actually pick up physical books to read instead of relying on audiobooks.

Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin | Forbidden by Beverly Jenkins | The Savior’s Champion by Jenna Moreci | At the Wolf’s Table by Rosella Postorino

Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin was a disappointment. Not for the writing, but for the character himself. He was selfish, spoiled, and a user — in other words, no redeeming quality to him whatsoever. It’s really tough to enjoy a book when you despise the character. 2 out of 5 Stars

Forbidden by Beverly Jenkins is the first book to her Old West series, which is the story of the girls’ Aunt Edie and Uncle Ryan. This was quite interesting as they were a mixed race couple. I especially love how determined Edie was to make a life for herself, with ambitions of owning her own restaurant. But she was so unlucky. Enjoyed this one. 4 out of 5 Stars.

The Savior’s Champion by Jenna Moreci is a Hungers Game type of novel in a fantasy setting. I haven’t read this one. But I downloaded it from Audible. It’s a 20-hour book. Might listen to it the whole weekend.

At The Wolf’s Table by Rosella Postorino is a novel about the people who tasted Hitler’s food for poison first before he ate them. Looking forward to starting this one!

So these are all the books I downloaded on audio this week. I’m endeavouring to read my physical copies in the next little while as I have quite a few.

Have you read/listened to any of these?

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Listening Library [2]

I honestly have more luck with my weekly downloads in my Libby than I do with my regular purchases. Out of all the books I downloaded last week, only one of them remain unheard (The World As It Is by Ben Rhodes). I so wish my library stocks more new releases. My credit card could use some breathing room. Lol.

The Last Romantics by Tara Conklin | Henry, Himself by Stewart O’Nan | Odd One Out by Nick Stone | Call Them By Their True Names by Rebecca Solnit

The Last Romantics by Tara Conklin follows a family from Connecticut and their strong bond amid a family crisis or two. I’m a huge fan of family sagas so this is right up my alley.

Henry, Himself by Stewart O’Nan. This book gave me the “A Man Called Ove” vibe for the simple facts that they are both at the same age as they ruminate about their past loves.

Odd One Out by Nic Stone 1/5 stars. Follows the story of three friends as they navigate through life on the path to self-discovery. I loved about three-quarters of the book, then hated the ending.

Call Them By Their True Names: American Crises by Rebecca Solnit is a collection of essays about violence against women. In the hands of the people they love, the police, and random acts of violence. This will be an anger-inducing, life-affirming commentary about women, more often than not, suffer the greatest at home.

I’m Afraid of Men by Vivek Shraya | Finding Lanston by Lesa Cline-Ransome | Heels Over Head by Elyse Springer | Breathless by Beverly Jenkins

I’m Aftraid of Men by Vivek Shraya. Such a powerful, own voices read. 4/5 Stars.

From Goodreads:

“A trans artist explores how masculinity was imposed on her as a boy and continues to haunt her as a girl–and how we might reimagine gender for the twenty-first century .” 

Finding Langston by Lesa Cline-Ransome. LOVED this one. 5 /5 Stars. This was a sad, heart wrenching read about a boy who gets bullied in his school.

Heels Over Head by Elyse Springer. I love me some M/M romance from time to time. This one follows two swimmers who are opposites — one openly gay, and the other, closeted. Excited to read this!

Breathless by Beverly Jenkins. I liked this one, too! 4/5 Stars. This is book 2 of the Old West series. Looking for the first book. I might have to use one of my Audible credits.

So these are the downloads that will keep me company on my walks and keep me sane during my workweek. Lol.

Happy listening!

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