Children’s Books Round Up


Alma and How She Got Her Name
by Juana Martinez-Neal
Publication Date: April 10th, 2018
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

This is such a wonderful story about the history of a little girl’s full name.

Alma Esperanza Jose Pura Candela.

Nowadays, the names of our kids hardly reflect our heritage. I know my kids’ names don’t have any history to speak of. We chose their names for the simple reasons that we liked them. I think it’s beautiful when your child asks you where their name came from and you can tell them a short history about it.

 


A Dog With Nice Ears
by Lauren Child
Publication Date: April 3rd, 2018
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Charlie and Lola was a favourite of my now 17-year-old daughter back in the day. I remember her speaking with an English accent for a time because she was absolutely obsessed! This book brought me back.

Anyway, this book was about Lola’s wish to have a puppy but Lola being Lola, she has particular requirements for a puppy. Charlie indulges her, of course and tries to find the perfect one.

 


We’re Going on a Bear Hunt
by Michael Rosen & Helen Oxenbury
Publication Date: Sept 23rd, 1997
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

This book is a re-issue but was sent to me sometime in the Spring by Candlewick Press.

Such a fun and slightly scary read about a family hunting bears. Moral of the story: don’t hunt bears. Lol. I absolutely love the format! Each pictures slides out so that it lets your child change the images that they see.

 


Where’s Waldo? Games on the Go
by Martin Handford
Publication Date: March 27th, 2018
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

One: I’m sad my kids are too old for this book.

Two: I’m sad that we don’t have the cabin anymore. It would’ve been fun to have this as my boy gets easily bored on the drive there.

Perfect book to distract your kids on a road trip. It contains puzzles, crosswords, and brain exercises for your older kids.

 


Not-So-Lucky Lefty
by Megan McDonald
Publication Date: March 13th, 2018
Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

My daughter is left handed. I have no idea how as my huband and I, as well our boy aren’t.

This is Judy’s adventure as she tries to navigate the day using only her left hand. She didn’t think it was all that difficult to start but she soons learn that it really wasn’t. She had loads of fun regardless.

Thank you to Random House Canada and Candlewick Press for sending me these.

Discovering Authors and their Works


With the discovery of an audiobook lending app from my library, comes the fruitful task of managing to read some books from my TBR that are long overdue. But on the other side of that coin is the discovery of new authors to obsess about and consequently acquiring more books.

Admittedly, Salman Rushdie is a household name in the annals of widely-known literary geniuses whose work I’ve considered as an unattainable dream. I didn’t think his writing would gel with my pedestrian comprehension skills. But when I found The Golden House available for download, I snapped it up right away. I had very little expectations as to how much I would enjoy the book. I knew it was going to go over my head. To my surprise, it proved me wrong. Now, I’m scrambling to find some of his novels. I picked up his controversial, award-winning novel, The Satanic Verses right away.

Preston Norton isn’t new to the YA world. But his most recent work, Neanderthal Opens the Door to the Universe, took my breath away. It was a beautifully written novel about grief, family, and friendship cultivated in an otherwise unwelcoming world. His book is easily one of my favourite reads this year and would be the diving board to plunging into his writing.

Ronald H. Balson’s Liam Taggart and Catherine Lockhart series is a true discovery. I could not stop reading/listening to the book. The first in a series about a lawyer and a private detective who became partners in a case about a World War II survivor set in exacting his revenge against a Nazi. My introduction to his work was breathtaking, heartbreaking, and simply beautiful. It had the air of making the reader feel wholly involved.

I love discovering authors and their work. It allows me to venture out of my reading comfort zone and examine how far I’d grown as a reader and as a person.

Have you discovered any good writing lately?

[751]: Aftermath by Kelley Armstrong

Aftermath
by Kelley Armstrong


Have you ever thought about what it was like for the families of the shooters who killed innocent people? Not in the way that they are victimized, but just how life goes on after one of their own shoot up a school and are labeled as murderers for the rest of their natural born life?

Kelley offers a fascinating perspective into the life of a victim in his or her own way. It was interesting, heartbreaking, and frustrating because this victim is the sister of one of the suspected shooters.  She was shunned and was treated like she pulled the trigger herself. On the other side of the coin is Jesse, whose brother was actually one of victims of the shooting itself. Once upon a time, Jesse and Skye were the best of friends. But because Skye’s brother was one of the shooters, their friendship was just one of the many things that ended on that day.

Being back in the town that Skye left soon after the tragedy happened was in the list of things she’d rather not do. But with her mother’s deteriorating state of mind, and her grandmother’s recent stroke left her no choice but to move back in with her aunt. To nobody else’s surprise, the town did not give her the warmest of welcomes – especially in a school where most of the students knew her and of her brother.  Everyone treated her like a pariah, even Jesse, her former best friend.

Everyday she’s faced with a reminder of the shooting. People haven’t moved on. Skye has known in her heart that Luka, her brother, was not the villain everyone had painted him to be. And as life in town and in school got even harder, she’d awaken a determination to get to the truth.

This was a hard read all around. I have read a lot of books by Ms. Armstrong but nothing as relevant a subject as a school shooting.  It’s a sensitive subject in it that the senseless loss of lives is involved, and an author needs to paint a clear view of both sides. I feel that Kelley did the best she could in presenting a non-biased view. She invoked a sincere empathy that made the readers feel all the difficult struggles on both sides, post-shooting.

Kelley is the equivalent of M. Night Shyamalan in the book world. She knows how to plot a twist that will leave you breathless upon reveal. The same goes in this novel. She crafted a convincing story that is a page turner of a thriller. Time and again, her characters are well padded, not necessarily wholesome; neither perfect, but the realest you’ll ever read.

Armstrong the veteran knows how to give her readers something new, compelling, and brave and she proves it with every book that she pens.

Throwback Thursday [13]: My First Instagram Post


On October 6, 2010, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger launched Instagram. In two years’ time, it went from having 13 people on its payroll to having 500 million users. Crazy.

I decided to check out what my very first Instagram post was. On July 27, 2011, I posted this picture.  It doesn’t have hashtags, nor even a caption. To this day, it has zero likes and zero comments. It only makes sense that my very first post would be about books.

Have I read any of these books, you ask? Well, let’s see:

There are 17 books in this picture. Out of those 17 books, I’ve only read 5 (Afterbirth by Sophie Littlefield, Wolfsbane by Andrea Cremer, Supernaturally by Kiersten White, Pearl by Jo Knowles, and Dead Rules by Randy Russell). I think it’s time to cull the shelves because I’m pretty sure I still have these books. #bookhoarderproblems.

[2] Romance Reads Round Up

Hot Asset
by Lauren Layne
4 out of 5 Stars


Ian Bradley is your quintessential hedge fund manager prowling Wall Street. Successfull, good looking, wealthy.  For a time, it seems like everything is going right in his world.

Until it wasn’t.

Lara McKenzie has a lot to prove. A daughter of FBI agents,  she knows the climb to the top will be steeper considering her parents’ reputation. So she will do anything to get a guilty ruling with her latest case. Unfortunately, Ian Bradley is just as determined for her to lose.

With great chemistry and smart repartee, Hot Asset proved to be such a fun and quick read. Lauren Layne’s latest series is clever, sexy, and at times, funny. The perfect recipe for a romance to fawn over.

I did experience some mild irritation when I learned why he was being investigated to begin with. I mean, besides the fact that he was allegedly inside trading, the real reason was a little flimsy at best.

Regardless, I’m chomping at the bit to follow this series. It sure has been a while since I’ve been obssessed with one.

Hard Sell
by Lauren Layne
4 out of 5 Stars


The Wolf of Wall Street is about to see his career go down in flames. It seems that all his hard partying life is about to catch up to him. Seen at a party where drugs and other acts of debaucharey are being performed, his clients and his bosses are none too happy.

If he has any hopes of saving his career and his reputation, he would need a miracle in the hands of the greatest PR person that ever lived.

Enter Sabrina Cross. A PR genius, Sabrina will have to pull all the stops in order to help Matt. Including signing up to become his pretend girlfriend.

Fortunately for Matt Cannon, they share a past. She’s the girl he knew he had zero chance of impressing no matter what he does. But that doesn’t stop him from trying any chance he gets. And because of their past, the pretending part only gets even more complicated. Feelings get in the way and hard choices will have to be made.

Once again, Ms. Layne nailed it with this follow up book. Matt and Sabrina sizzle with organic chemistry. These two light up a room with every look, and every smile they throw at each other. Oh, and the banters! She’s so good at this. It makes me wonder why I haven’t been reading a lot of her work.

Sabrina and Matt had a lot of growing up to do – well, more on Matt’s end. He knew the fast life needed to end if he ever wanted to keep the name he’s made for himself. Sabrina, on the other hand, only needed to wake up and realize what’s been in front of her face all along. Her background wasn’t the easiest life, but she sure crawled out of the pit in which she grew up.

Over all, this series is really proving to be an obsession I could easily get behind. With very little drama to speak of, you can only look forward to good times ahead.

[750]: The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner by Sarah Weinman

The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner
by Sarah Weinman


Sarah Weinman’s literary investigative piece aims to prove what Nabokov had long since denied: that Lolita was based on a true crime that happened in the 50s. It’s a huge undertaking to say the least. But Ms. Weinman is not new to the business. A journalist and a crime writer by trade, she knows a thing or two about investigation and research. The great deterrence to what she’d set out to do was time and paltry record-keeping.

She was forthcoming at least on the number of times she stumbled during the course of her investigation when she was unable to produce evidence. On the other hand, she was very convincing in her point that Nabokov somehow, someway imitated life when he wrote his novel. Through means of parallelization, Weinman at least made her case.

She also aims to give Sally Horner a voice, to tell her side of the story. She was a mere 11-year-old when she first encountered her abductor, but for whatever reason, Frank LaSalle didn’t take her right away. He waited another year before he came back for Sally. Two years after her abduction, Sally showed no physical trauma. But the psychological implications of her captivity had a lasting, albeit, short effect. Short, because she died in a car accident shortly after.

Sally’s fateful meeting with LaSalle began as a shoplifting prank. Dared to steal a notebook from the store just to try and get into her peer’s good graces, Sally didn’t realize that someone witnessed it all. And before she could even walk out the door, she was grabbed by a man who claimed to be an FBI agent. Threatened to send to her to a reform school as a punishment, LaSalle then told her that if she cooperated with him in some capacity, he would release her on a premise that he’d come back to mete out her punishment.

He sought her out again after months of disappearing. He told her that the ‘government’ wanted her to come with him to Atlantic City but she can’t tell her family the truth. He convinced her to tell them that she was going away with her friend and her family for the weekend. With a mere phone call from Frank pretending to be the friend’s father, Sally’s mother took her to the bus station under the assumption that she would meet up with her friend. It would be two years later before she would see Sally again.

What followed was two years of spent mostly on the road, living the assumed life of a widowed father with his daughter in tow.

As in Lolita, Humbert was undeniably portrayed as a predator of deviant taste. Nabokov didn’t pull any punches or romanticized the kind of monster he was. LaSalle was very much the same. His criminal life involved a number of abduction and sexual relations with children. But Humbert was fictional, and LaSalle was very much real. Weinman drew subtle parallels between the characters and the storyline quite effectively so – which, in my opinion was highly convincing.

On the Night Table [51]


Fling Club by Tara Brown | What If It’s Us by Albertalli & Silvera | Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

It certainly has been a while since I’ve posted one of these.

This week, I’m aiming to read two books that I’ve received for review and one that I’ve salivated for this past summer.

Fling Club by Tara Brown promises to be a funny read about revenge in the land of the rich and famous. I’m down for witnessing the castration of a cheater, so yeah. I decided to finally pick this up. Lol.

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera. Are there better character names than Arthur and Ben? I tell you, if I ever have boys babies in the future, I certainly will choose these names. Boys who love boys stories are my jam, so yeah. DYING to finally read this!

Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram. I’m a quarter in. Looking forward to reading the rest. Darius is a quirky but lonely boy that makes my maternal instincts go haywire. I just want to hug him. <3

What are you reading this week?

Hoarders, Books Edition: Episode 214


Daughters of Castle Deverill by Santa Montefiore | Vox by Christina Dalcher | An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green | Darius the Great Is Not Okay by Adib Khorram | Seafire by Natalie C. Parker | International Guy Vol. 2 by Audrey Carlan | The Fling Club by Tara Brown | Hard Sell by Lauren Layne

Hello, dear readers.

Welcome to an overdue book haul post.

These are just some of the books I’ve received for review recently. I have a few more but I don’t want to bore you with an unnecessarily long post. Besides which, I’ve already read a few of those and even some featured in this post. These books are from Simon & Schuster Canada, Penguin Random House Canada, and Thomas Allen & Sons Ltd – thank you so much for the continued patronage even though I’ve been a horrible partner as of late. Rest assured that I’m slowly trying to get my act together.

From Net Galley:

Believe it or not, I’ve already read these as well. I downloaded these books last week and because two of them are romance, I read them quite fast. Romance reads tend to be like an open can of Pringles for me. Lol. Also, holy hell. Summoned to Thirteenth Grave! A much-awaited series ender. I devoured it one night. I’m freaking mad at myself because, not only do I have to wait till I can get my hands on a hard copy, I also need to wait for Beep’s series. Gah.

I will be a part of a re-read blog tour for the Charley Davidson series in November so keep your eyes peeled for that. I think I’m supposed to read book nine.

Anywho, I hope you’re having a great reading week.

xoxo

[749]: The Widow’s Watcher by Eliza Maxwell

A stunning portrayal of grief and loss, of friendships and family; The Widow’s Watcher is a gem full of hope that life exists even after an irreparable loss.


The Widow’s Watcher
by Eliza Maxwell

Jenna Shaw has no reasons left to live. It is how she found herself in a small town somewhere in Minnesota to end her life.  Fortunately for her, Lars Jorgensen simply would not let her accomplish what she’d set out to do. There’d been too many people that had gone from his life. Jenna Shaw is not going to be one of them even if she was a stranger. So when she set out to end her life in this frozen town, she was not at all prepared for what awaited her.

Escaping the heartache of losing her family in one fell swoop was what she’s after – a quick way to end the burden of guilt of having survived. In this Minnesota town is an unresolved mystery involving the disappearance Jorgensen’s children. It has haunted Lars all through his life and had broken his heart.  Hardened by time and the guilt, Lars saw through and even sympathized with Jenna. After all, the guilt of having survived such tragedies was what he had in common with Jenna.

Thrusts into the heart of my mystery, she finds a new purpose by trying to avoid her own loss.  But what if she finds more loss and grief than a way to heal?

I wanted to be immersed in a story full of mysteries but I never expected to find it here. There are heartbreaking stories left and right. From the tragic death of Jenna’s entire family, to Lars’ missing children, my heart was on a vise grip the whole time.  There is also a question of Lars’ wife whose story is equally, if not more so, heartbreaking.

But this book is beautiful, too. It was in the way everybody found solace in the most unexpected way. It was in the redemption of a nearly forfeited life. I mean Lars did not give up even after losing his children and the mental illness that had plagued his wife all her life. He remained staunch in his belief that his children were alive and that his wife will remember what had happened that night.

All I wanted was someone to find happiness no matter how there was very little to be had.

This is a very character-driven novel. Jenna and Lars grew up – so to speak – as the novel progressed. Friendships were formed, however reluctantly at first.  Jenna and Lars found purpose in each other, and solace when they both didn’t even want it.

Waiting on Wednesday [17]: October Releases


So many great reads on my list this month! I honestly don’t know how my wallet I can cope. My book buying budget has gone down considerably over the years as I have a kidlet who’s about to go to college. (When did that happen?!). So yeah, my book buying adventures hasn’t been the same. Nevertheless, I persist. Lol.

So here are the books that I so want to read, but I’d probably be relegated to drooling.

 

The Ragged Edge of Night
by Olivia Hawker


Publishing Date: Oct 1st.

Historical Fiction in the vein of All The Lights We Cannot See? Take my money! I’m actually reading one right now set in World War II during Germany’s occupation of Poland. Much like all the other books I’ve read in this period, it’s heartbreaking and scary if you think about the resurgence of White Supremacists all over the world. Looking forward to reading this.

 

Saga, Volume 9
by Brian K. Vaughn & Fiona Staples


Publication Date: Oct 2nd

Admittedly, I’m a publication behind. So after I pick up a copy of this widely-loved graphic novel, I’m going to read them both at my leisure. I heard the artists are going to take a hiatus – boo – so I’m sort of glad I haven’t read #8 yet.

 

 

Consumed
by JR Ward


Publication Date: Oct 2nd

I actually read this already but I think it warrants a re-read. I was sent an ARC of this book in the summer and didn’t waste a minute and got to reading right away. It’s different, but in some ways still a quintessential JR Ward novel. I dug it.

 

 

 

What If It’s Us
by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera


Publication Date: Oct 9th

I’ve been sallivating for this novel for a while now and was so jealous of everyone posting their ARCs on Instagram. Too bad I have to wait another week to procure myself a copy. Sigh. Looking forward to what kind of fresh UST hell this book has in store for me. Because it certainly looks like it’s going to be stingy.

 

The Library Book
by Susan Orlean


Publication Date: Oct 16th

I will always gravitate towards books about libraries and, well, books. I’m programmed that way. I also love reading about bibliophile and how books help shape the way they become as a person. I’m looking forward to reading this one for that very reason.

Keeping this list short, loves. There are a few books out this month but we can’t always get what we want, and I for one, can’t afford to buy them all. Lol.

What’s on your list today? Leave me a link!