[743]: The Thief by J.R. Ward

A disappointing installment that tried and failed to inspire a renewed fervor for the author’s favorite character.


The Thief
by JR Ward

I haven’t reached the point in which I’d say I’m over with this series – no matter how much I didn’t enjoy an installment. Well, maybe I came close as I read the first few chapters of the latest. Truthfully, I was looking forward to reading this because the Warden said it was about Assail and Sola. Their story was long overdue and I’d waited long enough. So I was ecstatic and have pined for this book for a year. But as we all know, Warden does not only dedicate a book solely on a pair of characters. She tends to fill the pages with stories of other characters as well.

Let’s get the ugliness out of the way first.

Vishous and Mary. It is with to my utter disappointment that the Warden sullied by initial admiration for this couple. In all honesty, I disliked Mary here and I hated Vishous with the passion of a thousand suns. I won’t get into the whys because it would be revealing too much of their part of the story. Let’s just say that Mary was painted as the victim of blame the victim scenario, and Vishous – well, he was not the man I loved in the past few books. He was insecure – far from the alpha male, take-charge vampire of the old and he was too selfish. Me, me, me. He blames Mary for the widening rift in their marriage because Mary was too busy being a doctor. Dude. What? Spare me the you-don’t-have-time-for-me-anymore bullshit. The worst part? And this is after his transgressions, Mary was only too willing to forgive and forget. Arrrggghhhhh.

Realistic, though as it was, seeing as every happily married couple goes through rough patches at one point in their blissful union, what Vishous did was an unforgivable sin. Call me insane, but he was one step away from the cliff. Regardless of whether or not he jumped is irrelevant. The truth of the matter is, there was planning involved. He’d thought of it and made it happen. So, screw you, V!

The good part.

Assail and Sola. We finally have their story and it was a good one. They are the sole saviors of this trainwreck. Assail is still under a coma from going cold turkey from his heroin addiction (or was it cocaine?). They were ready to pull the plug on him when his cousins intervened. They thought that if anybody could bring him back from the brink, it would be Sola. But she wasn’t so receptive to come back at first considering there was a price over her head. Needless to say, and miracles of miracles, he woke up as soon as Sola made her presence known. La di da, they’re reunited and their love blossoms.

The conflict in their story was that Sola didn’t know of Assail’s true nature. And because she comes from a staunch Catholic upbringing, vampires aren’t exactly God’s greatest creation. So he hid that fact for as long as he could until he couldn’t. At the same time, Sola’s enemies are gunning for her head.

Overall, I didn’t get off to a good start with this book. It was a placid installment as far as this series goes. Am I going to stop reading? Hell no. These characters have become a part of my life now that it would be as if I’m cutting ties with my best friends for no reason at all if I’d stop. In goodness and in bad, I’m in for the long haul.