[728]: The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr

The One Memory of Flora Banks
by Emily Barr
Publication Date: January 12th, 2017
Stand Alone
Rating: 2 out of 5 Stars

This book was repetitive af. But then again, that was the point. I suppose it only makes sense when you have a character who goes through a memory reset of sorts as soon as she falls asleep. And such is the state of Flora Banks’ life.

It’s odd, disconcerting, and sad as hell. I actually felt bad for Flora. It’s tough navigating through life without a memory of what happened the day before. So she writes these little reminders for herself. Also, with her memory as frail as it is, what kind of parents would leave her alone?! I mean, I get that they have another child that was in a perilous medical emergency but come on. Leaving her in the care of another teen is simply irresponsible. Especially when Flora ended up being alone for the duration of their being away due to some unforeseen events.

So her brain doesn’t have a great memory bank to begin with. Anything she does the day before she forgets. But when she kisses this boy, the memory stuck. What does our Flora do? She goes off on her own to find this boy (who, by the way was her bff’s boyfriend) in the Arctic, no less! The freaking ARCTIC, yo. As a mom, I was terrified for her. The lengths she went through to find this boy was just insanity. I also get that this lone memory of her kissing the boy was sort of an anchor she held on to, but grrrl. GRRRL. Seriously. Who does that?! I cannot with this girl.

Back to the repetitive nature of this book, it was really a great representation of her brain disorder. She’s like, Dory, ya know? So she reads this notebook of her life that her mom wrote for her every morning so she’ll remember who she is. But still. It got tiresome so fast that I started skimming as soon as she starts rehashing her life like a Groundhog Day that never ends. Flora also has this uncanny child-like voice. Since she hasn’t been able to hold a memory since she was 10 years old, her describing what went on between her and the boy left me feeling a little strange.

In the end, the book didn’t do it for me. I vacillated between horrification at her parents who left her alone, and strange wonder at a girl who was brave enough to go after the one thing that made her feel “normal” for once.