Review: Dark of the Moon by Tracy Barrett

Publication Date: September 19th, 2011
Harcourt Children’s Books
Format: Hardcover, 320 pages

Goodreads Summary

Ariadne is destined to become a goddess of the moon. She leads a lonely life, filled with hours of rigorous training by stern priestesses. Her former friends no longer dare to look at her, much less speak to her. All that she has left are her mother and her beloved, misshapen brother Asterion, who must be held captive below the palace for his own safety.
So when a ship arrives one spring day, bearing a tribute of slaves from Athens, Ariadne sneaks out to meet it. These newcomers don’t know the ways of Krete; perhaps they won’t be afraid of a girl who will someday be a powerful goddess. And indeed she meets Theseus, the son of the king of Athens. Ariadne finds herself drawn to the newcomer, and soon they form a friendship—one that could perhaps become something more.
Yet Theseus is doomed to die as an offering to the Minotaur, that monster beneath the palace—unless he can kill the beast first. And that “monster” is Ariadne’s brother . . .

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MY TAKE: Unrated

This is a Greek Mythology remixed. If you were like me, whose knowledge in that subject is pretty limited to the usual (the Trojan War), then this book would probably not be for you.

Dark of the Moon focuses on the legend of Minotaur; a half-beast, half-human brother of Ariadne.

This book is intricate, with characters that you’d need first hand knowledge of. I had a hard time keeping up with everyone’s gods and goddesses, religious practices and who belongs to which, for lack of a better word, tribe. I had a hard time following the story line period. I was bombarded with a whole slew of characters that I felt I had to have a refresher course just to understand what their roles were.

I’m going to be completely honest and say that I have no idea who Minotaur is. I’ve never read of his myth at all and therefore, I must say that I had a difficult time reading and understanding this book.

I did love Ariadne’s love and affection for Asterion (her brother). Often times, the scenes played out poignantly as I pictured a delicate girl taking care of the beast in the palace’s dungeons.

If you’re looking for romance, you won’t find it here. Incidentally, I feel like I should start questioning my intelligence should I read The Goddest Test and actually like it. But we all know reading is subjective. And I’m a romance reader first before anything else. Does that make this book bad? Well, no. In fact, if I were into Mythology retelling sans the aspect of romance, I think I would have loved this book. The author’s creativeness about the subject made this book multi-dimensional. She wrote about legends, religion and the importance of family. I’m just sorry I didn’t like it as much as I would have.

This book was written well, and those who are fans of Greek Mythology retelling would absolutely love this book. But it really wasn’t for me. I am not sure if I should rate it. I neither like it nor hate it.